Box Launches Control Campaign

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Video-jukebox programmer The Box Music Network announced
last week that it has launched a new multimillion-dollar marketing campaign -- centered
around the theme, "Control Your Music" -- in an effort to strengthen its brand
personality.

New York-based MK Advertising helped to develop the print
ads, which broke last week and which will be followed by cross-channel commercials and
radio spots within a few weeks.

"Research is telling us that viewers really see and
understand that they control what goes on the air, and that we're all music,"
The Box senior vice president of affiliate sales and marketing Greg Willis said.
"What the viewer doesn't truly understand is that we are tailoring our music
headend by headend."

Viewers of the TCI Music Inc.-owned analog-cable network,
which has 24 million subscribers in the United States, pay about $1.99 to request a video
from a local playlist, either over the phone or through the network's Web site.

According to Willis, the playlists in inner-city Detroit
may concentrate more heavily on urban music, whereas Miami Beach, Fla., might feature
Latin music, and Fairfax, Va., may focus on country.

"We can adjust the mix, depending on the local
environment," what's selling in local software stores and what's playing on
the radio, Willis said. "We can also break videos faster than any other
networks."

The Box aims at viewers aged 12 to 24, and it grew its
domestic subscriber base by 84 percent last year, Willis said, adding that the network is
looking to add another 5 million domestic subscribers this year.

The branding campaign is set to run through the end of the
year. Willis said that as The Box evolves into more of a traditional network, operators
will benefit more from things like local ad sales. And because of its file-server
technology, The Box gives cable operators the chance to co-brand the network at the system
level.

In addition to its analog-cable network, The Box also
offers a six-channel digital-cable package called "Box Set," as well as an
interactive Web site, www.thebox.com.

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