HBO Lifts Woodbury to President of Global Distribution

Has Domestic, International Oversight In Newly Created Role
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HBO has elevated veteran Tom Woodbury to the newly created position of global distribution.

Reporting to HBO chairman and CEO Richard Plepler, Woodbury in his new role has overall oversight for domestic and international revenue operations and continued responsibility for the premium programmers's network business affairs.

Previously, Woodbury has been serving  as general counsel and executive vice president of network business affairs, working as chief legal officer on all legal matters pertaining to the company, and as chief legal liaison to Time Warner. He was named to this position in December 2008. 

Additionally, he was responsible for business affairs matters pertaining to affiliate sales, international and technology operations, areas he had overseen since 2004, when he was promoted to executive vice president, business affairs and legal, sales and network operations.

"Tom’s intelligence, judgment and institutional memory about our business are well known to everyone who has worked with him over his distinguished career at HBO. He has long been a central participant in shaping HBO’s strategy," said Plepler.  "Additionally, he has proven to be an invaluable advisor to many and we are fortunate that he will now lend those talents to leading an even larger team. By aligning these groups more closely, we are even better positioned to take full advantage of the exciting business opportunities before us."

Woodbury joined HBO in April 1981 as associate counsel, sales and marketing.  He was named chief counsel, sales and marketing, in February 1984, and became head of the legal department’s affiliate relations the following year. At that point, he was named vice president and chief counsel, sales and marketing, before being to senior vice president and chief counsel, US Networks, in 1999.

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