Jeff Binder Departs as T-Mobile Video Chief

Veteran pay TV executive will return to his entrepreneurial roots
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Jeff Binder, who headed T-Mobile’s video business since the wireless company bought his pay TV start-up Layer3 TV at the beginning of 2018, quietly left the company earlier this week, T-Mobile confirmed.

Robert Gary, senior VP in the T-Mobile Home and Entertainment Division, which Binder led, has stepped in as general manager of the unit, reporting to T-Mobile COO Mike Sievert. Gary has responsibility for both TVision, T-Mobile's new pay TV service, and the wireless company's home internet initiative. T-Mobile said the move makes sense in that it combines TV and home internet under one common management structure.

Light Reading first reported the news.

Binder’s departure comes just weeks after T-Mobile launched a rebranded version of Layer3 TV, called TVision, in the eight markets in which Layer3 TV had already been available.

Since announcing its purchase of Layer3 in December 2017—a deal reported to be worth $318 million—T-Mobile had been promising a “disruptive” TV service. The launch of the $90-a-month TVision Home service is said to be a precursor to a national, mobile-centric service, based on 5G technology, that will supposedly launch after T-Mobile closes on its purchase of Sprint and puts its 5G plans in motion.

“Say goodbye to exploding offers and hidden fees, and say hello to more 4K, personalized TV that learns you, a huge lineup of your favorite channels and a massive on-demand library!! This is just the beginning and there are some amazing things to come!! #wewontstop” tweeted Binder on April 14 after the TVision launch.

The reason for Binder’s departure has not been reported. But T-Mobile is crediting the veteran pay TV executive for getting TVision Home launched. Binder is said to be interested in getting back into the start-up game.

Before founding Layer3, Binder was was co-founder, president and CEO of Broadbus Technologies, which was acquired by Motorola in 2006.

With T-Mobile still trying to close its Sprint purchase, other changes at the company appear to be afoot, including a shakeup of the marketing department that was outlined in an internal memo, also released earlier this week. 

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