Lifetime Adds Public Affairs Pair In LA

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Lifetime Networks has added two members to its public affairs department in Los Angeles.
The women's programmer has named Danielle Carrig as senior vice president, advocacy and public affairs and Amanda Crumley as vice president, advocacy and public affairs.
Carrig, who joins Lifetime from Step Up Women's Network, will develop and manage Lifetime's public affairs and advocacy campaigns, oversee corporate giving and events, while maintaining and initiating the company's partnerships with hundreds of leading women's organizations, governmental agencies and media entities.

She will report directly to Meredith Wagner, Lifetime's executive vice president of advocacy, public affairs and corporate communications.
Crumley, who will report to Carrig, is a Washington insider and veteran of numerous national and statewide political campaigns. Her responsibilities extend to public awareness campaigns and liaising among Lifetime's departments on the development of advocacy-inspired content and community outreach on key programs and issues for women. She also will be charged with leading Lifetime's policy efforts and advocacy on its viewers' behalf in Washington, DC, a dimension of public service unique to Lifetime that has resulted in the passage of five bills into law.
"Very few individuals in the public affairs arena can claim the breadth of experience and long-standing relationships in Washington and Hollywood that both Danielle and Amanda bring to the company," said Wagner in a statement. "For 25 years, Lifetime has been at the forefront of making a positive difference in women's lives by launching programs to End Violence Against Women, Stop Breast Cancer for Life and ensure that Every Woman Counts in the halls of power. I am very much looking forward to working with Danielle and Amanda in an effort to further Lifetime's advocacy endeavors in these and other important areas."
Crumley and Carrig join the Lifetime team as a number of its staffers elected not to move from New York to Los Angeles, which is now home to many of the programmer's disciplines.

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