Mexicanal Expands Coverage in Calif.

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The Mexicanal Network is building its distribution in California,
with digital multicast distribution in Los Angeles
(KBEH), San Diego (K5OLL) and Palm Springs (KMIR); as well as additional cable
distribution with Comcast in San Francisco.

With these new launches, Mexicanal -- a joint venture
between Atlanta-based Castalia Communications and Cablecom of Mexico -- will
add 1.1 million additional Hispanic households to its audience. Deals were not
disclosed.

Mexicanal boxing

Mexicanal president Luis Torres-Bohl told Multichannel News the recent rollouts
place channel in the nation's No. 1 Hispanic market, Los
Angeles, home to the largest U.S. Mexican population.
"Needless to say, it is the most important Hispanic market in the country,"
says Torres-Bohl.

Already available nationwide via DirecTV's satellite-TV
platform, Mexicanal now reaches more than 4 million Hispanic homes through a
mix of cable, satellite and multicast distribution. Its programming, which
hails from a network of affiliate broadcasters and stations throughout Mexico,
features news, sports and culturally relevant shows from throughout that
country.

It is different from other Spanish-language channels in that
it offers programming from Jalisco, Michoacán, Aguascalientes,
Oaxaca, Chiapas
and many other states that represent the hometowns of the majority of
U.S.-based Mexican immigrants.

"Our newscasts don't come from Washington,
D.C., Mexico
City or Los Angeles," said
Torres-Bohl, a native of Peru
who claims to be "Mexican by choice."

Put together by a local team in a state-of-the-art
production and transmission facility in San Luis Potosí, Mexico, Mexicanal
prides itself of presenting a truly varied view of Mexico, with news and
entertainment that focus on the country's different regions. A robust Web site
complements programming offerings and serves as a platform to receive feedback
from viewers both in Mexico
and the U.S.

"We want to be available in several platforms, from
television and the Internet to making our programs available on demand," adds
Torres-Bohl.

As for future launches, the executive has his sight set on
the heavy-Hispanic markets where it is not yet present via cable or multicast,
including Denver and New York, two
markets with a growing Mexican population.

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