MTVN, MySpace Team on Presidential ‘Dialogues’

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MTV Networks and News Corp.’s MySpace signed a deal to produce a series of "one-on-one dialogues between the leading presidential candidates and America’s youth" from college campuses, to be broadcast on MTV and mtvU as well as live on MTV.com and MySpaceTV.

The deal follows another political cable/Internet pairing: CNN and Google’s YouTube, which hosted debate-format events with user-submitted questions for Democratic candidates last month and will run a similar one for Republican hopefuls in November. 


MTVN and MySpace’s first broadcast will feature former Sen. John Edwards in New Hampshire on Thursday, Sept. 27.

The events -- to be held on college campuses across the country between September and December of this year -- will let at-home viewers and a local audience members ask candidates questions in real-time. MTV viewers and MTV.com and MySpace users will be able to submit questions via instant-messenger, mobile device or e-mail and viewer reaction will be captured through live polls on both MTV.com and MySpace.com.

MTVN and MySpace said 11 candidates have already confirmed their participation, including Edwards, Sen. Sam Brownback, Sen. Hillary Clinton, Sen. Chris Dodd, former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani, Rep. Duncan Hunter, Sen. John McCain, Sen. Barack Obama, Rep. Ron Paul, Gov. Bill Richardson and former Gov. Mitt Romney.

MTVN said the project with MySpace will be a key element of the programmer’s "Choose or Lose" series, first launched in 1992. The network said it would soon announce additional details of the 2008 "Choose or Lose" campaign.

"For years, young people have trusted MTV to inform and engage them on the issues that matter most, from politics to sexual health to the environment," MTV president Christina Norman said in a statement. "We’re extremely proud to partner with MySpace on our always evolving, Emmy-winning 'Choose or Lose' campaign, as we join forces and empower our audiences to connect with Presidential candidates in a much more meaningful way."

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