Rep. Doyle: 209 House Dems Committed to Net Neutrality Bill

Still needs a handful more Dems or some GOP turn-arounds
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Rep. Mike Doyle

Rep. Mike Doyle (D-Pa.) offered his insights into telecom policy to summit attendees.

At press time the Democrats did not have enough Democratic vote commitments to pass the Save the Internet Act, at least according to its sponsor and prime mover, Rep. Mike Doyle (D-Pa.).

According to Doyle's office, as of Monday (April 8), 209 members, all Democrats, had "voiced their support" for the bill, which would restore rules against blocking, throttling and paid prioritization, plus a general conduct standard that would allow the FCC to regulate conduct not covered under those rules, but that it concluded impeded an open internet.

Related: Net Neutrality Remain Fighting Words on Capitol Hill

The bill needs at least 217 votes to to pass. There are currently 432 House members, 235 Democrats and 197 Republicans (with three vacancies).

The bill passed the full committee last week on a party line vote, as it had the Communications Subcommittee the week before. Doyle will need some of the uncommitted Dems to join that party line this week.

But the bill's prospects beyond the House are even more problematic.

The Office of Management and Budget said Monday it would advise the President to veto the bill if it gets to its desk. It would have to first pass the Democratic House, where its chances are thought to be good the lack of on-the-record Dems notwithstanding. The Republican-controlled Senate is another matter, where even some Democrats prospects are dim.

But net neutrality activists continue to put pressure on legislators on both sides of the aisle to get aboard the internet re-regulatory bandwagon.

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