TNT Unveils New On-Air Look

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Starting tomorrow, Turner Network Television plans to get in better shape. On June 12, it's slated to replace the oval-shaped logo that's long represented the 13-year-old network with a new, more-contemporary round icon.

TNT also will add the tag line "We Know Drama" as it unveils its new on-air look Tuesday.

The network revamped its logo to help make itself more relevant to viewers who are not yet looking to the network for drama on a regular basis, executive vice president and general manager Steve Koonin said.

At the same time, TNT did not want to turn away the viewers who have already made the network a Nielsen staple. By using the same colors — red and yellow — as found in the older logo, "we retain the familiarity," Koonin said.

The TNT logo was last updated in late 1995.

The sleeker, more youthful logo "allows us to do 100 different things" on-air, Koonin said, including more readily tying it in with the National Association for Stock Car Racing (NASCAR) or National Basketball Association logos.

The network's emphasis on drama by no means excludes sports, which are integrated into the new promotional campaign featuring movie, television and sports stars speaking about what drama means to them.

Hollywood notables, including Whoopi Goldberg, Dennis Hopper and Martin Short, appear in the spots, while Shaquille O'Neal and Dale Earnhardt Jr. are among the sports celebrities who endorse the brand.

Koonin said the campaign would be backed by $100 worth of media, most of it from within the AOL Time Warner family. The ads will run on Cable News Network, TBS Superstation, Cartoon Network and The WB, as well as Turner's airport network.

TNT has also bought time on other cable networks to reach its key target of upscale 18-to-49-year-olds.

In addition to the on-air and cross-channel ad campaign, TNT will relaunch its Web site (www.tnt.tv) on Tuesday. Corporate sibling America Online will also provide links to the site at keyword TNT, Koonin said.

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