TWC Widens Wideband In North Carolina - Multichannel

TWC Widens Wideband In North Carolina

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Time Warner Cable is slowly expanding its "wideband" 50 Megabits per second Internet service in North Carolina, identifying High Point, N.C., as among the first communities in the Piedmont Triad area to receive the upgrade.

The cable operator said the DOCSIS 3.0-based wideband Internet service, which provides 50 Mbps down and 5 Mbps up, will be available to High Point customers by spring, with other Triad cities receiving the service later this year. Elsewhere in the state, TWC in January 2011 said it would launch wideband in Raleigh, Cary, Durham, Chapel Hill and Wilson later this spring.

Pricing for the 50/5 tier has yet to be determined, according to Time Warner Cable spokeswoman Melissa Buscher said.

The wideband service also will be available as part of TWC's Signature Home package, priced at $200 per month for a triple play of video, voice and Internet services. Current Signature Home customers in the area have Road Runner Turbo (up to 25 Mbps down) and will be upgraded to the 50/5 Wideband tier at no additional charge when it becomes available, Buscher added.

"Time Warner Cable's Wideband Internet is our most powerful Internet product for customers and will more than triple current internet speeds," Dianne Blackwood, TWC's area vice president of operations for Greensboro, said in a statement. "Time Warner Cable is committed to delivering products that meet the high-speed data needs of our business customers and our residential customers who want the fastest speeds at home for their computers, smartphones and game consoles."

Time Warner Cable's East Region provides video, Internet and telephone services to more than 5.9 million residential and business customers, in more than 1,300 cities in nine states: Alabama, Maine, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New Hampshire, New York, North Carolina, South Carolina and Virginia.

TWC, which has not been as aggressive at deploying DOCSIS 3.0 as other MSOs, offers 50-Mbps service in markets including New York City, Dallas, and Buffalo, N.Y.

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