A-Twitter Over Net Neutrality

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WASHINGTON — Federal Communications
Commission chairman Julius Genachowski
got little unalloyed praise for his proposal
last week to codify and expand network
neutrality rules while at the same time giving industry
enough room to innovate and monetize.

The following is a “twitterpated” (trimmed
down to 140 characters or less, not including
names and titles) take on just some of
that flood of initial reaction to the draft proposal,
as edited by Washington bureau
chief John Eggerton.

“I commend Chairman
Genachowski for taking this
important next step towards
preservation of a free and
open Internet.”

REP. ED MARKEY (D-MASS.)

“This is a compromise
that gives nobody
everything that they
wanted and everybody
something.”

MICHAEL WILLNER, CEO,
INSIGHT COMMUNICATIONS

“Pushing a small group of
hand-picked industry players
toward a ‘choice’ between a
bad option or a worse option
smacks more of coercion than
consensus or compromise.”

ROBERT MCDOWELL, REPUBLICAN FCC
COMMISSIONER

“I certainly welcome any
departure from the
‘third way’ proposal
circulated earlier
this year.”

REP. GENE GREEN (D-TEXAS)

“We believe chairman
Genachowski’s proposal …
strikes a workable balance
between the needs of the
marketplace and the certainty
that carefully-crafted and
limited rules can provide.”

DAVID COHEN, EXECUTIVE VP, COMCAST

“We’re going to be like a dog
on a frisbee on this.”

REP. FRED UPTON (R-MICH.)

“It is basically the old fairness
doctrine from radio days applied
to the Internet. They have a
hysterical approach to what is
a hypothetical problem.”

REP. MARSHA BLACKBURN (R-TENN.)

“FCC chair proposes garbage,
calls it net neutrality.”

MARVIN AMMORI, PROFESSOR,
UNIVERSITY OF NEBRASKA

“You can call any policy
net neutrality, but the devil is
always in the details — and
right now, the details look grim.”

JOSH SILVER, PRESIDENT, FREE PRESS

“The proposal from
FCC chairman
Genachowski isn’t net
neutrality, it’s a
corporate giveaway.”

JASON ROSENBAUM, SENIOR ONLINE
CAMPAIGNS DIRECTOR, PROGRESSIVE
CHANGE CAMPAIGN COMMITTEE

“A Title II framework would
have imposed large and
burdensome costs on
small cable operators that
offer broadband service.”

MATT POLKA, AMERICAN CABLE
ASSOCIATION

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