Volume Control

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Better Than Now

“Watching recorded video through video on demand services or DVRs like TiVo maybe be only a fraction of TV viewing today, but I say it will surpass 'live’ TV watching by 2012.”

John Gartner, Marketing Shift

www.marketingshift.com

No Love on a One-Way Street

“I believe that, in the near future, satellite-TV providers will not compare favorably to cable and phone companies when it comes to video-on-demand, high-definition TV, broadband Internet, and voice-over-Internet Protocol [telephony]. VOD requires two-way communication, which seems to work better over cables and wires than via satellite. Right now, DirecTV and Dish Network don’t do it very well, or at least not as well as cable companies like Comcast, which offers a VOD lineup that the satellite operators can’t come close to matching.”

Terry Mitchell, CommenTerry

commenterry.blogs.com

Conflicted Views

“As the cable companies continue to offer more options to subscribers, there needs to be some way to measure who is watching what in order to manage the advertising. There is already a system in place that tries to fill the void, but it has its problems. For one, the cable companies have control over the numbers, which obviously presents a huge conflict of interest.”

Brett Love, TV Squad
www.tvsquad.com

Spots Before Your Eyes

“While the last thing we need is to see more advertising creep into VOD, I’m all for anything that will give service providers a good reason to expand the content available to time-shifting viewers.”

Brad Linder, PVRWIRE

www.pvrwire.com

Charge of the Geek Brigade

“2007 will be the year of Internet-based video-on-demand services … I expect we’ll see more content owners in this playground as the new industry coalesces into something mainstream consumers, rather than the bleeding-edge geek set, can utilize and appreciate. Microsoft’s Xbox 360, along with Apple’s forthcoming ITV media extender, will lead the charge.”

Dave Zatz, Zatz Not Funny!

www.zatznotfunny.com

Censorship’s Not On Demand

“Nearly nine out of 10 American households now have cable or satellite TV, and pretty soon video on demand via the Internet will be similarly common. But the Supreme Court already has rejected attempts to censor cable and the Internet in the name of protecting children, and I think it’s more likely to reconsider broadcasting’s special First Amendment status than it is to put other video delivery methods in the same category.”

Jacob Sullum

www.reason.com/blog

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